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Market Sector

Point Casino

Point Casino
8
May

Located in the beautiful Port Gamble Bay, in Washington State’s Puget Sound, The Point Casino is the latest state of the art tribal gaming facility to utilize Sprung structure technology. The Port Gamble S’Klallum Tribe wanted to expand it’s existing gaming facility and offer the very latest in gaming technology. After careful consideration of a wide range of building solutions, the tribe liked the concept of accelerating the design and construction of the new facility utilizing the Sprung concept and hired FFKR architects and Lonestar Construction.

In late 2011 construction began on The New Point Casino utilizing a specially designed curved Sprung structure with an adjacent entertainment pavilion. The entire project was erected from ground breaking to completion in just nine months. The grand opening of the facility was held in May, 2012.

One of the attractive features of The New Point Casino is a showcase of S’Klallam art which is displayed with specially designed graphic panels around the perimeter of the Sprung structures. In addition to over 500 games, the Point Casino has an upscale restaurant and two other casual dining choices, and an event center that can seat 760 people.

“We’re calling ourselves the Peninsula’s new home for entertainment,” Scott Laursen, Marketing Director said.

“It’s an all-new animal.” Kelly Sullivan Baze, deputy executive director of the Tribe, said, “I think it’s exciting. I think it’s really good to see such a good product and have it represent the tribe in a good way. It’s a classy place. Tribal members are going to be very proud.”

At 52,000-square-feet, the new Point Casino is more than twice the size of its predecessor; the old casino, which is now converted into offices. The Point is a cultural center of sorts. “S’Klallam art is fairly prominent,” Sullivan Baze said. “We created labels for them so they are recognized distinctly as art work and not just decoration.

“Areas were built for the art with recessed areas and lighting. We have created a map for people so they can identify art pieces. The most prominent pieces are a nice display of paddles behind the cashier’s cage; large wooden murals that will be displayed, made of old growth cedar, in the fine dining area; large cedar mats and beautiful baskets. We have a good variation of types of art — panels, masks, drums, carved salmon, weavings.”

Testimonial

“I think it’s exciting. I think it’s really good to see such a good product and have it represent the Tribe in a good way. It’s a classy place. Tribal members are going to be very proud.”